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Archaeopress: Publishing Scholarly Archaeology since 1997
Communicating the research of thousands of archaeologists worldwide.

Archaeopress is an Oxford-based publisher specialising in scholarly books and journals in the field of archaeology and related heritage subjects.

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NEW: The Antonine Wall: Papers in Honour of Professor Lawrence Keppie edited by David J. Breeze and William S. Hanson. Paperback; 206x255mm; 494 pages; 166 figures; 15 tables (exp. RRP £30.00). 613 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 64. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694505. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694512. Book contents pageDownload

The Antonine Wall, the Roman frontier in Scotland, was the most northerly frontier of the Roman Empire for a generation from AD 142. It is a World Heritage Site and Scotland’s largest ancient monument. Today, it cuts across the densely populated central belt between Forth and Clyde.

In this volume, nearly 40 archaeologists, historians and heritage managers present their researches on the Antonine Wall in recognition of the work of Lawrence Keppie, formerly Professor of Roman History and Archaeology at the Hunterian Museum, Glasgow University, who spent much of his academic career recording and studying the Wall. The 32 papers cover a wide variety of aspects, embracing the environmental and prehistoric background to the Wall, its structure, planning and construction, military deployment on its line, associated artefacts and inscriptions, the logistics of its supply, as well as new insights into the study of its history. Due attention is paid to the people of the Wall, not just the officers and soldiers, but their womenfolk and children.

Important aspects of the book are new developments in the recording, interpretation and presentation of the Antonine Wall to today's visitors. Considerable use is also made of modern scientific techniques, from pollen, soil and spectrographic analysis to geophysical survey and airborne laser scanning. In short, the papers embody present-day cutting edge research on, and summarise the most up-to-date understanding of, Rome's shortest-lived frontier.

The editors, Professors Bill Hanson and David Breeze, who themselves contribute several papers to the volume, have both excavated sites on, and written books about, the Antonine Wall.

Table of Contents
List of Figures ;
List of Tables ;
List of Contributors ;
Abbreviations ;
1. Lawrence Keppie: an appreciation – David J. Breeze and William S. Hanson ;
2. The Antonine Wall: the current state of knowledge – William S. Hanson and David J. Breeze ;
3. The Landscape at the time of construction of the Antonine Wall – Mairi H. Davies ;
4. The Impact of the Antonine Wall on Iron Age Society – Lesley Macinnes ;
5. Pre-Antonine coins from the Antonine Wall – Richard J Brickstock ;
6. Planning the Antonine wall: an archaeometric reassesment of installation spacing – Nick Hannon, Lyn Wilson, Darrell J Rohl ;
7. The curious incident of the structure at Bar Hill and its implications – Rebecca H Jones ;
8. Monuments on the margins of Empire: the Antonine Wall sculptures – Louisa Campbell ;
9. Building an image: soldiers’ labour and the Antonine Wall Distance Slabs – Iain M. Ferris ;
10. New perspectives on the structure of the Antonine Wall – Tanja Romankiewicz, Karen Milek, Chris Beckett, Ben Russell and J. Riley Snyder ;
11. Wing-walls and waterworks. On the planning and purpose of the Antonine Wall – Erik Graafstal ;
12. The importance of fieldwalking: the discovery of three fortlets on the Antonine Wall – James J. Walker ;
13. The Roman temporary camp and fortlet at Summerston, Strathclyde – Gordon S. Maxwell and William S. Hanson ;
14. Thinking small: fortlet evolution on the Upper German Limes, Hadrian’s Wall, the Antonine Wall and Raetian Limes – Matthew Symonds ;
15. The Roman fort and fortlet at Castlehill on the Antonine Wall: the geophysical, LiDAR and early map evidence – William S. Hanson and Richard E. Jones ;
16. ‘... one of the most remarkable traces of Roman art ... in the vicinity of the Antonine Wall.’ A forgotten funerary urn of Egyptian travertine from Camelon, and related stone vessels from Castlecary – Fraser Hunter ;
17. The Kirkintilloch hoard revisited – J.D. Bateson ;
18. The external supply of pottery and cereals to Antoni
NEW: The Neolithic Lithic Industry at Tell Ain El-Kerkh Excavation Reports of Tell el-Kerkh, Northwestern Syria 1 by Makoto Arimura. Paperback; 205x290mm; 388 pages; 158 figures, 192 tables, 132 plates. Print RRP: £60.00. 618 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694567. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694574. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Northwest Syria during the Neolithic period has been less well studied than the rest of the northern Levant, where Neolithisation first took place in the Near East. The Neolithic Lithic Industry at Tell Ain El-Kerkh presents the first attempt to unveil the Neolithisation process in northwest Syria, with the techno-typological studies of the flintstone implements from Tell Ain el-Kerkh in the Rouj basin in Idlib, which was an important large Neolithic site occupied from the from the 9th to the 7th millennium BC.

Examination of the lithic record from Tell Ain el-Kerkh revealed techno-morphological changes in flint tools during the long Neolithic sequence from the Early Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB) to the end of the Pottery Neolithic. The author interprets such changes in stone tools in the socio-economic context of the Neolithic. Through the comparison between the data obtained from Tell Ain el-Kerkh and other Neolithic sites in the northern Levant, the regional characteristics of northwest Syria during the Neolithic period are highlighted. In the end, two important issues in the Neolithic Levant, diffusion of the PPNB culture and the PPNB collapse, are discussed based on the results of this study.

This volume includes substantial original data, drawings, and analysis of lithics from Neolithic sites in Syria, which will be useful for future discussion of the changes in material culture in relation with the Neolithisation process in the Near East.

About the Author
Makoto Arimura is a professor at Tokai University, Japan. He obtained his undergraduate degree in archaeology (1995) from the University of Tsukuba, Japan, under Professor Akira Tsuneki, and his PhD in archaeology (2007) from the Université Lumière Lyon 2, France, under Professor Olivier Aurenche and Dr Éric Coqueugniot. After a project assistant post at the Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (RIHN), Kyoto (2006), he worked at the Tokyo National Research Institute for Cultural Properties (NRICP) as a research fellow (2007–2012). He taught at Kanazawa University as an associate professor in museology (2013–2016). Arimura has participated in the excavation of Near Eastern prehistoric sites such as Tell el-Kerkh and Dja’de el-Mughara, Syria. His primary research topic is the transformation of human society during Neolithisation, through changes in material culture, particularly the transition of stone tool manufacturing technology in the Neolithic Near East.
NEW: Late Prehistoric Fortifications in Europe: Defensive, Symbolic and Territorial Aspects from the Chalcolithic to the Iron Age Proceedings of the International Colloquium ‘FortMetalAges’, Guimarães, Portugal edited by Davide Delfino, Fernando Coimbra, Gonçalo P. C. Cruz and Daniela Cardoso. Paperback; 205x290mm; 256 pages; 93 figures; 5 tables; 2 maps (colour throughout). 617 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692549. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692556. Book contents pageDownload

Late Prehistoric Fortifications in Europe: Defensive, Symbolic and Territorial Aspects from the Chalcolithic to the Iron Age presents the contributions to the International Colloquium ‘FortMetalAges’ (10th–12th November 2017, Guimarães, Portugal), The Colloquium was organised by the Scientific Commission ‘Metal Ages in Europe’ of the International Union of Prehistoric and Protohistoric Sciences (UISPP/ IUSPP) and by the Martin Sarmento Society of Guimarães. Nineteen papers discuss different interpretive ideas for defensive structures whose construction had necessitated large investment, present new case studies, and conduct comparative analysis between different regions and chronological periods from the Chalcolithic to the Iron Age.

About the Editors
Davide Delfino obtained his PhD from the University of Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro. He is a Bronze Age specialist at the Italian Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities, Visiting Professor at the Polytechnic Institute of Tomar (UNESCO Chair in Humanity and Cultural Integrated Landscape Management), and an internal researcher of the Geosciences Centre (University of Coimbra). In 2015 Davide was appointed secretary of the UISPP/IUPPS Scientific Commission ‘Metal Ages in Europe’. ;

Fernando A. Coimbra holds a PhD in Prehistory and Archaeology (University of Salamanca ‘Extraordinary Prize’). Fernando is Visiting Professor at the Polytechnic Institute of Tomar, and internal researcher of the Geosciences Centre (University of Coimbra), Portugal, where he completed post-doctoral research on the Bronze and Iron Age rock art of the Tagus Valley. He is a member of several research projects in Portugal, Italy, Malta and Greece. ;

Gonçalo P. C. Cruz graduated in History and Archaeology at the University of Minho (Braga, Portugal) and is a staff archaeologist at the Martins Sarmento Society, Guimarães. His work involves the research and management of the archaeological sites under the administration of the Society, namely the Citânia de Briteiros and Castro de Sabroso, as well as the functioning and activity in different nuclei of the Martins Sarmento Museum. ;

Daniela Cardoso graduated in Landscape Archaeology at the Polytechnic Institute of Tomar, held an Erasmus award in Italy at the University of Ferrara in 2000, and completed in 2002 her Master of Advanced Studies degree at the Institute of Human Palaeontology, Paris. In 2015 she obtained her PhD in ‘Quaternário, Materiais e Culturas’ at the University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, Portugal. She is currently Senior Museum Technician at the Martins Sarmento Society.
NEW: Tales of Three Worlds - Archaeology and Beyond: Asia, Italy, Africa A Tribute to Sandro Salvatori edited by Donatella Usai, Stefano Tuzzato and Massimo Vidale. Paperback; 205x290mm; 372 pages; 260 figures (128 plates in colour). 615 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694406. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694413. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Tales of Three Worlds collects, as a sign of gratitude and affection, a series of papers by many authors who, in different times, contexts and contingencies, had the luck to meet Sandro Salvatori, and share with him a path of knowledge and mutual personal acquaintance. The book is divided in three sections. Whatever was the apparent relevance of what he was documenting and protecting, Sandro always acted with a deep sense of personal responsibility and with the utmost care. The first section deals with his long years of work in Middle Asia, from the plains of Sistan to those of the Indus, the coasts of the Omani peninsula and southern Turkmenistan. Here, as all authors acknowledge, Sandro's papers have marked true benchmarks of archaeological research – milestones that will be used by others for many future decades for new outlines of the social evolution in the involved regions. The second tells about Sandro's activities in Italy, as an officer of the Archaeological Superintendency (Ministry of Cultural Heritage) of his region; for years, he was daily on duty for monitoring and preserving a wide range of cultural contexts, often far from the lights of the academic scenarios. Third comes a section on the prehistory of north-eastern Africa, a context in which Sandro could work in full scientific and familiar ease, as he was prevented from doing in other situations. The groundbreaking nature of his work here is self-evident. The editors and authors of the book know very well that the sign left by this book is certainly too little for what Sandro has actually done in our field and in the life of many friends and colleagues – but the sign is a long-due one, and it is sincere.

About the Editors
Donatella Usai graduated in Italian prehistory and holds a PhD in African Archaeology. She is director of the El-Salha/Al- Khiday Archaeological Project-CSS&S in Sudan since 2000; has published various monographs and numerous papers on prehistory of Africa and other areas where she has been working for the past thirty years.

Stefano Tuzzato specialised in classical and medieval archaeology at the Catholic University of Milan. He is a professional archaeologist and project manager in archaeology and permanent collaborator of the Superintendencies, conducting interventions for public bodies, for individuals and for companies mainly in Italy but also abroad (Nepal, Giordania, Turkmenistan, Sudan). He published numerous papers in specialised magazines and monographs.

Massimo Vidale has carried out archaeological and ethnoarchaeological studies in Italy, Asia and Africa for the last 45 years. His main focus is the study of ancient and traditional craft technologies, interlaced with the micro-stratigraphic study of ancient workshops and activity areas. He is Professor of Archaeology of Craft Production and Near Eastern Archaeology at the Department of Cultural Heritage of the University of Padova.
NEW: Archaeology: What it is, where it is, and how to do it (4th Edition) by Paul Wilkinson. Paperback; 190x250mm; 104 pages; illustrated in full colour throughout; additional material online. 612 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695311. £15.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695601. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £15.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

BACK IN PRINT: Archaeology: What It Is, Where It Is, and How to Do It has been written as a practical introduction on the investigation of the material remains of the past which can be interpreted with contemporary historical and literary evidence. The book also explains where to find this evidence and what to do next. Many aspects of archaeological investigation are discussed, including aerial and ground survey, excavation and fieldwork, recording methods, soil sampling and small finds.

‘A very useful basic introduction to archaeology’Mick Aston

‘I wish this book had been available when I started out in archaeology back in the 1960s. It tells you everything you need to know in order to decide what sort of archaeology you’d like to learn more about. It doesn’t just deal with digging; instead it introduces you to aerial photography, geophysics, surveying, recording, finds processing, soil science and how to take samples – in fact all the subjects you’ll need to master if you want to become a field archaeologist. It’s well written and beautifully illustrated in full colour throughout. It would be cheap at twice the price!’Francis Pryor

First published in 2007. 4th edition published in 2020.
NEW: Bringing Down the Iron Curtain Paradigmatic Change in Research on the Bronze Age in Central and Eastern Europe? edited by Laura Dietrich, Oliver Dietrich, Anthony Harding, Viktória Kiss and Klára Šabatová. Paperback; 205x290mm; 186 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (30 pages in colour). 610 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694543. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694550. Book contents pageBuy Now

Bringing down the Iron Curtain: Paradigmatic changes in research on the Bronze Age in Central and Eastern Europe? presents the researches of scholars of different generations from twelve countries (Hungary, Romania, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Serbia, Croatia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Germany, USA, Canada, Austria) who participated in a session of the same title at the 20th Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists in Istanbul, 2014. The papers addressed the question of change in the approaches to Bronze Age research in the Central and Eastern European countries from different points of view. It has been a quarter of a century since the fall of communism in Central and Eastern Europe and the opening up of these areas to the West. With this process, archaeology saw a large influx of new projects and ideas. Bilateral contacts, Europe-wide circulation of scholars and access to research literature has fuelled the transformation processes. This volume is the first study which relates these issues specifically to Bronze Age Archaeology. The contributions discuss not only theoretical issues, but also current developments in all aspects of archaeological practice.

About the Editors
Laura Dietrich studied prehistoric archaeology in Bucharest and Berlin. She has worked on projects from south-eastern Europe to the Levant, and since 2011 has been a Research Assistant at the German Archaeological Institute. Her research focuses on the archaeology of food and conflict.

Oliver Dietrich studied prehistoric archaeology in Berlin and works at the German Archaeological Institute. His research focus is the Neolithic and Bronze Age between south-eastern Europe and the Near East. His interests include archaeology of religion and cult, metallurgy, agents of craft in prehistory and distribution modes of prehistoric innovations.

Anthony Harding is Emeritus Professor of Archaeology at the University of Exeter, UK, and an Affiliate of the Philosophical Faculty of Charles University, Prague. He specialises in European Bronze Age archaeology and has written several books and many articles on various aspects of the Bronze Age. He has led excavations in Poland, the Czech Republic and Romania as well as Britain. In recent years he has worked extensively on the archaeology of salt exploitation.

Viktória Kiss is a senior research fellow of the Institute of Archaeology, Research Centre for the Humanities of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. She specialises in Central European Bronze Age archaeology. She has written a book about Middle Bronze Age Encrusted Pottery in Western Hungary, and edited several other volumes concerning the Bronze Age archaeology of the region. In recent years she has worked on pottery, metal production, bioarchaeology and mobility.

Klára Šabatová studied archaeology at Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic, and teaches prehistory there. Her research focuses on Bronze Age and landscape archaeology in Central Europe. Her interests include the processing of large quantities of pottery and settlement archaeology. She has led excavations on Neolithic and Bronze Age sites in Moravia. At present she is particularly concerned with Bronze Age chronology and burial rites.
NEW: Approaches to the Analysis of Production Activity at Archaeological Sites edited by Anna K. Hodgkinson and Cecilie Lelek Tvetmarken. Paperback; 205x290mm; 206 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (58 pages in colour). 609 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695571. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695588. Book contents pageDownload

Approaches to the Analysis of Production Activity at Archaeological Sites presents the proceedings of an international and interdisciplinary workshop held in Berlin in 2018, which brought together scholars whose work focusses on manufacturing activities identified at archaeological sites. The various approaches presented here include new excavation techniques, ethnographic research, archaeometric approaches, GIS and experimental archaeology as well as theoretical issues associated with how researchers understand production in the past. These approaches are applied to research questions related to various technological and socio-economic aspects of production, including the organisation and setting of manufacturing activities, the access to and use of raw materials, firing structures and other production-related installations. The chapters discuss production activities in various domestic and institutional contexts throughout the ancient world, together with the production and use of tools and other items made of stone, bone, ceramics, glass and faience. Since manufacturing activities are encountered at archaeological sites on a regular basis, the wide range of materials and approaches presented in this volume provides a useful reference for scholars and students studying technologies and production activities in the past.

About the Editors
Anna K. Hodgkinson (PhD Liverpool 2014) has recently completed a post-doctoral research fellowship at the Excellence Cluster Topoi. Her research focusses on Late Bronze Age (LBA) Egyptian settlement archaeology, LBA glass industries and chemical analysis of LBA glass objects. She has conducted archaeological fieldwork at the LBA Egyptian sites of Amarna, Gurob and Qantir.

Cecilie Lelek Tvetmarken (PhD Liverpool 2013) has worked as a post-doctoral researcher on several projects at the German Archaeological Institute (DAI), Berlin, and is currently involved in the joint Iranian-Danish research project ‘Tracking Cultural and Environmental Change’ (Razi University, Kermanshah, and the University of Copenhagen). Her research focusses on architecture and the use of space during the Neolithic in the Near East. She has conducted archaeological fieldwork at several Neolithic sites in Turkey, Jordan and Iran.
NEW: The Hypocephalus: An Ancient Egyptian Funerary Amulet by Tamás Mekis. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+356 pages; 95 figures, 36 plates. 586 2019 Archaeopress Egyptology 25. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693331. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693348. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The hypocephalus is an element of Late Period and Ptolemaic funerary equipment – an amuletic disc placed under the head of mummies. Its shape emulates the sun’s disc, and its form is planar, although it occasionally has a concave shape (in such cases, it protects the head as a funerary cap). The earliest known example can be dated to the 4th century BC and the latest to the 2nd/1st century BC. The Hypocephalus: an Ancient Egyptian Funerary Amulet analyses both the written records and iconography of these objects. So far, 158 examples are known; several, unfortunately, from old descriptions only. The relatively low number shows that the object was not a widespread item of funerary equipment. Only priest and priestly families used them, those of Amon in Thebes, of Min in Akhmim, and the ones of Ptah in Memphis. Among the examples, no two are identical. In some details, every piece is an individualized creation. Ancient Egyptian theologians certainly interpreted hypocephali as the iris of the wedjat-eye, amidst which travels the sun-god in his hidden, mysterious and tremendous form(s). The hypocephalus can be considered as the sun-disk itself. It radiates light and energy towards the head of the deceased, who again becomes a living being, feeling him/herself as ‘one with the Earth’ through this energy. The texts and the iconography derive principally from the supplementary chapters of the Book of the Dead. Some discs directly cite the text of spell 162 which furnishes the mythological background of the invention of the disc by the Great Cow, who protected her son Re by creating the disc at his death.

About the Author
Tamás Mekis graduated from the Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest in 2007 with a degree in Egyptology. In 2013 he defended his PhD dissertation with summa cum laude. In quest of hypocephalus amulets he spent his traineeship in Brussels at the Royal Museums of Art and History in 2008 and in Paris at the Louvre Museum in 2010. He conducted extended researches at the Egyptian Museum of Cairo in 2007-9 and 2014-15, where, together with the curators of the museum, he found a rare hypocepalus of the prophet-registrar of Min-Horus-Isis Djed-hor/Wesirwer in situ, under the head of his undisturbed mummy. Tamás is an independent researcher.
NEW: Ceramics and Atlantic Connections: Late Roman and Early Medieval Imported Pottery on the Atlantic Seaboard Proceedings of an International Symposium at Newcastle University, March 2014 edited by Maria Duggan, Mark Jackson and Sam Turner. Paperback; 210x297mm;vi+150; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (Print RRP: £30.00). 583 2019 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 15. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693379. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693386. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Atlantic Seaboard has attracted increasing interest as a zone of economic complexity and social connection during Late Antiquity and the early medieval period. A surge in archaeological and, in particular, ceramic research emerging from this region over the last decade has demonstrated the need for new models of exchange between the Mediterranean and Atlantic, and for new understandings of links between sites along the Western littoral of Europe. Ceramics and Atlantic Connections: Late Roman and Early Medieval Imported Pottery on the Atlantic Seaboard stems from the Ceramics and Atlantic Connections symposium, hosted by the School of History, Classics and Archaeology, Newcastle University, in March 2014. This represents the first international workshop to consider late Roman to early medieval pottery from across the Atlantic Seaboard. Reflecting the wide geographical scope of the original presentations by the invited speakers, these nine articles from ceramic specialists and archaeologists working across the Atlantic region, cover western Britain, Ireland, western France, north-west Spain and Portugal.

The principal focus is the pottery of Mediterranean origin which was imported into the Atlantic, particularly East Mediterranean and North African amphorae and red-slipped finewares (African Red Slip and Late Roman C and D), as well as ceramics of Atlantic production which had widespread distributions, including Gaulish Dérivées-de-Sigillées Paléochrétiennes Atlantique/DSPA, céramique à l’éponge’ and ‘E-ware’. Following the aims of the Newcastle symposium, the papers examine the chronologies and relative distributions of these wares and associated products, and consider the compositions of key Atlantic assemblages, revealing new insights into the networks of exchange linking these regions between c. 400-700 AD. This broad-scale exploration of ceramic patterns, together with an examination of associated artefactual, archaeological and textual evidence for maritime exchange, provides a window into the political, economic, cultural and ecclesiastical ties that linked the disparate regions of the Late Antique and early medieval Atlantic. In this way, this volume presents a benchmark for current understandings of ceramic exchange in the Atlantic Seaboard and provides a foundation for future research on connectivity in this zone.

About the Editors


Maria Duggan works on European Late Antique and early medieval archaeology, particularly focusing on late Roman and Byzantine pottery and long-distance exchange and contact. She is currently a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow at Newcastle University and the British School at Athens, conducting research on the imported ceramic assemblage from Tintagel, Cornwall.

Mark Jackson is Senior Lecturer in Archaeology at Newcastle University. He teaches and researches Late Antique, Byzantine and early Islamic archaeology in the Mediterranean and has a particular research interest in ceramics.

Sam Turner works on medieval archaeology and the cultural heritage of landscapes, with particular interests in Britain, Europe and the Mediterranean. He has worked at Newcastle University since 2004, where he is now Professor of Archaeology and Director of the interdisciplinary McCord Centre for Landscape.
NEW: Eastern Roman Mounted Archers and Extraordinary Medico-Surgical Interventions at Paliokastro in Thasos Island during the ProtoByzantine Period The Historical and Medical History Records and the Archaeo-Anthropological Evidence by Anagnostis P. Agelarakis. Paperback; 203x276mm; iv+50 pages; 28 figures, 1 table (colour throughout). 111 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696011. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696028. Book contents pageDownload

Procopius’ History of the Wars, and the Strategikon offer important aspects of Eastern Roman military tactical changes adopted against their enemies that brought the mounted archer-lancer to domineer in the synthesis of the army, along with concise descriptions of their training, panoply, and effectiveness in the battlefield during the later ProtoByzantine period. Yet, evidence in the archaeo-anthropological records of these highly specialized military members has remained elusive.

A recent archaeological discovery at the strategically positioned, upland, site of Paliokastro in Thasos island, Greece, and the subsequent study of the human skeletal remains interred in four monumental funerary contexts, in a dedicated naiskos building, provide for the first time through the archaeological record of the region a unique insight of the mounted archers and their female kin during the turbulent ProtoByzantine period. The interdisciplinary study of the anthropological materials focusing on skeletal developmental, acquired skeleto-muscular manifestations and skeleto-anatomical changes recovered valuable evidentiary data on aspects of their in vivo long-term training and preparation, traumatisms and pathologies along with extraordinary traces of cranial and infra-cranial surgical interventions and medical regimens by the hands of a most experienced surgeon.

In conjunction with the archaeological and anthropological evidence, historical and medical history records are integrated aiming toward a nexus with the human dynamics that transpired at Paliokastro within the context of the catastrophic consequences of the ‘barbarian’ invasions in the Aegean Thraco-Macedonia, and the ravages afforded by the Justinian plague during the later component of the ProtoByzantine period.

About the Author
Anagnostis P. Agelarakis is Professor of Anthropology in the Department of History at Adelphi University in New York. He studied Classical Archaeology and European Ethnology as an undergraduate, and as graduate Environmental Studies at Lund University and Lund Polytechnic Institute in Sweden. He holds a M. Phil. and Ph.D. (1989) in Anthropology from Columbia University, New York.
NEW: Pottery of Manqabad A Selected Catalogue of the Ceramic Assemblage from the Monastery of ‘Abba Nefer’ at Asuyt (Egypt) by Ilaria Incordino. Paperback; 203x276mm; 128 pages; fully illustrated catalogue in colour. 110 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695137. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695144. Book contents pageDownload

Pottery of Manqabad presents a catalogue of selected pottery from the monastic site of Manqabad (Asyut, Egypt), which has, since 2011, been the object of an ongoing study and conservation project at the University of Naples ‘L’Orientale’ (UNIOR). The ceramic material, dated to the Late Antique Period, derives mostly from the SCA warehouse of el-Ashmunein, where it was kept soon after its accidental discovery in 1965. About 40 items derive from the surface collection and survey conducted on the site during the last fieldwork season (2018). The typologies identified include the most relevant Byzantine classes and a particular link with production from the Middle Egypt region. Part of the field survey was devoted to the analysis of the pottery material still in situ, found in the Northern Sector of the site where a 230m long row of monastic housing units is located. Further investigations will hopefully support the hypothesis of a local pottery production area, which could be identified in a large ‘dump’ at the southern end of the site. More generally, the analysis of the ceramics from Manqabad has underlined the undoubtedly high cultural level of the local monastic community, which can be deduced also from the textual, architectural and wall depiction evidence from the site. Manqabad was largely unknown to the scientific community, but since the first season of work by the Italian-Egyptian project, it has emerged as an important venue for the religious development of Coptic culture between the second half of the Vth to the end of the VIII- early IXth century AD.

About the author
Ilaria Incordino is Research Fellow and Adjunct Professor of Egyptology (BA) at the University of Naples ‘L’Orientale’ (UNIOR). Since 2011 she has been Deputy Director of the Italian-Egyptian Project of Study and Conservation of the Monastery of Manqabad, Asuyt, Egypt (UNIOR, Rome University, SCA), in charge of the study of the Late Antique pottery. She was promoter of several academic events at UNIOR: the Summer School ‘Pottery of the Nile Valley. Classification, documentation and new technology of analysis’ (2019), the ‘Current Research in Egyptology conference’ (2017), the MA in ‘Egyptology: Research Methods and Technology’ (2010) and the ‘First Neapolitan Congress of Egyptology’ (2008). In 2016 she was Curator of the new exposition of the Egyptian Collection of the National Archaeological Museum in Naples (MANN). She was member of the UNIOR excavations in the Eastern Central Desert (UNIOR, Helwan University, Cairo University) and at Mersa/Wadi Gawasis (UNIOR, Boston University).
NEW: Las relaciones comerciales marítimas entre Andalucía occidental y el Mediterráneo central en el II milenio a.C. by Mercedes de Caso Bernal. Paperback; 203x276mm; 140 pages; 30 figures (27 pages in colour). Spanish text. 109 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695113. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695120. Book contents pageDownload

This volume reflects on the unique status of the Western Mediterranean in the Bronze Age, considering the independence of its development and the existence of an indigenous maritime trade. It looks at ways to establish a chronology of the period that is not based solely on ceramic typologies, and aims to clarify the cultural exclusion to which the Lower Guadalquivir is subjected.

Tres son los principales problemas que se abordan para la Edad del Bronce en el Mediterráneo Occidental: La independencia en su desarrollo. La realidad de un comercio marítimo autóctono y la existencia de una cultura con tintes supraregionales. A los que se suman otros dos: Establecer una cronología del periodo que no se deba únicamente a las tipologías cerámicas, y esclarecer la exclusión cultural a la que es sometida el Bajo Guadalquivir, en la Península Ibérica.

La Geografía Física y la Humana son las bases en la que se apoya toda la investigación. En ellas se sumergen los análisis de las culturas en estudio y sus relaciones comerciales a través de la arqueología. La climatología dará explicación a la cronología y a los comportamientos socioeconómicos producidos, pudiéndose realizar un estudio sobre el tipo de sociedad existente o los motivos de las diferentes inauguraciones y clausuras de las poblaciones.

Mercedes de Caso Bernal, doctora internacional en Historia y Arqueología Marítima. Ha participado en varias investigaciones en Italia y proyectos nacionales e internacionales. La tesis doctoral ha abordado la Edad del Bronce en el Mediterráneo Occidental, siendo el caballo moderno autóctono el tema de su investigación posdoctoral en el que profundiza, al ser entendido como elemento de prestigio comercial para el mismo periodo cronológico.
NEW: Digging into the Dark Ages Early Medieval Public Archaeologies edited by Howard Williams and Pauline Magdalene Clarke. Paperback; 203x276mm; 368 pages; 162 illustrations (138 pages in colour). 108 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695274. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695281. Book contents pageDownload

What does the ‘Dark Ages’ mean in contemporary society? Tackling public engagements through archaeological fieldwork, heritage sites and museums, fictional portrayals and art, and increasingly via a broad range of digital media, this is the first-ever dedicated collection exploring the public archaeology of the Early Middle Ages (5th–11th centuries AD).

Digging into the Dark Ages builds on debates which took place at the 3rd University of Chester Archaeology Student Conference hosted by the Grosvenor Museum, Chester, 13 December 2017. It comprises original perspectives from students integrated with fresh research by heritage practitioners and academics. The book also includes four interviews offering perspectives on key dimensions of early medieval archaeology’s public intersections. By critically ‘digging into’ the ‘Dark Ages’, this book provides an introduction to key concepts and debates, a rich range of case studies, and a solid platform for future research.

About the Editors
Professor Howard Williams is Professor of Archaeology at the University of Chester and researches mortuary archaeology, archaeology and memory, the history of archaeology and public archaeology. He regularly writes an academic blog: Archaeodeath.

Pauline Magdalene Clarke graduated with a BA (Hons) degree in Archaeology with History in 2018, and an MA Past Landscapes and Environments in 2019, both from the University of Chester. Her MA dissertation focussed on the taphonomy of plant macrofossils.
NEW: Wonders Lost and Found: A Celebration of the Archaeological Work of Professor Michael Vickers edited by Nicholas Sekunda. Paperback; 205x290mm; 230 pages; 152 figures (82 pages in colour). 608 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693812. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693829. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Wonders Lost and Found: A celebration of the archaeological work of Professor Michael Vickers comprises, in all, twenty-one contributions, all on archaeological themes, written by friends and colleagues of Professor Michael Vickers, commemorating his contribution to archaeology. The contributions, reflecting the wide interests of Professor Vickers, range chronologically from the Aegean Bronze Age, to the use made of archaeology by dictators of the 19th and 20th centuries. Seven contributions are related to the archaeology of Georgia, where the Professor has worked most recently, and has made his home.

About the Editor
Nicholas Sekunda was born in 1953 and lived in England for the first part of his life, completing his studies at Manchester University. He has held research positions at Monash University in Melbourne and at the Australian National University in Canberra. He then worked for a British Academy research project as sub-editor for the Lexicon of Greek Personal Names in Oxford, and later taught ancient history for a year at Manchester University. Since 1994 Nicholas has lived in Poland, where his father was born. He has taught at the Nikolaus Copernicus University, Toruń, and currently holds the post of Head of Department of Mediterranean Archaeology at Gdansk University. He has participated in excavations in England, Poland, Iran, Greece, Syria and Jordan, and now co-directs excavations at Negotino Gradište in the Republic of North Macedonia. He is the author of a number of books concerning Greek Warfare.
NEW: Landscapes of Human Evolution: Contributions in Honour of John Gowlett edited by James Cole, John McNabb, Matt Grove and Rob Hosfield. Paperback; 205x290mm; 204 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white.. 607 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693799. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693805. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Landscapes of Human Evolution is an edited volume in honour of John Gowlett. John has a wide range of research interests primarily focused on the human genus Homo, and is a world leader in understanding the cognitive and behavioural preconditions necessary for the emergence of complex behaviours such as language and art. John is also a leader in investigating the early history of fire use and control in relation to social action and hominin communication. Landscapes of Human Evolution seeks to mirror John’s research profile and explores some of the most recent thinking regarding human evolution from the biological and cognitive development of our human ancestors, to the behavioural adaptations necessary to survive changing Pleistocene landscapes and environments. Specifically, Landscapes of Human Evolution focuses on the development of large hominin brains and bipedal locomotion; hominin interactions with landscape; and the amplification of complex hominin behaviours and social structures from the control of fire through to changing lithic technologies. Such an overview of the development of human ancestral species from a biological, cognitive, social, and behavioural perspective is particularly timely given the many recent advances in our understanding of the complexities of human evolution.

About the editors
James Cole is Principal Lecturer in Archaeology at the University of Brighton. He has undertaken Palaeolithic fieldwork in the UK, Albania, Greece, Kenya and Tanzania; and his research focuses on the Lower and early Middle Palaeolithic (Europe) and Early and Middle Stone Age (Africa). He is particularly interested in interpreting hominin behaviours from the material culture record in regards to understanding cognitive ability and potential.

John McNabb is Senior Lecturer in Palaeolithic Archaeology at the University of Southampton. He has undertaken Palaeolithic fieldwork in the UK, Greece, South Africa and Tanzania. His research interests explore the meaning of stone tool variability in the African and European Palaeolithic, and what that might mean for social and cognitive evolution. He has researched the history of human origins research, in particular as it was reflected in Victorian and Edwardian fiction.

Matt Grove is Reader in Evolutionary Anthropology in the Department of Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology at the University of Liverpool. His research examines the impact of climatic change and variability on human evolution, with a particular focus on the manifestations of behavioural plasticity in the archaeological record of Homo sapiens in eastern Africa.

Rob Hosfield is Associate Professor in Palaeolithic Archaeology at the University of Reading. He has undertaken Palaeolithic fieldwork in the UK and Africa (Sudan), and his research has focused on Lower and early Middle Palaeolithic hominin settlement histories, survival strategies and material culture.
NEW: Anthropomorphic Images in Rock Art Paintings and Rock Carvings edited by Terence Meaden and Herman Bender. 606 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693577. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693584. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In the realm of rock art, humanlike images appear widely through time and space from the Upper Palaeolithic to the Neolithic and Bronze Ages, and for some continents to later, yet still prehistoric, times. The artworks discussed in Anthropomorphic Images in Rock Art Paintings and Rock Carvings range from paintings, engravings or scratchings on cave walls and rock shelters, images pecked into rocky surfaces or upon standing stones, and major sacred sites (among them Gobekli Tepe, Avebury, Stonehenge, and the Palaeolithic Chauvet Cave) in which the possibility exists of recovery of the meanings intended by the artists and sculptors. Such prospects can relate to known or inferred legends, myths, folklore, rites and ritual, and often allude to matters that recognise the unremitting benefits of human, animal and crop fertility to humankind. Occasionally, relevant art forms are present not in whole but as pars pro toto, in which a part stands for or symbolises the whole. Images or artistic compositions often articulate, in ways more or less manifest, scenes of dramatic action as with hunting and dancing, mating and birthing, ritual and ceremony, some of which may openly or latently express yearnings for the rewards of fruitful fecundity – as with the much-loved worldview known as the hieros gamos or Sacred Marriage.

About the Editors
Terence Meaden has Oxford University degrees in archaeology (MSc) and physics (MA, DPhil). Formerly a physics professor, in retirement he is working full time in fieldwork and landscape archaeology studying aspects of the Neolithic and Bronze Age periods, chiefly in Ireland, Scotland and England. Recent publications include Stonehenge, Avebury and Drombeg Stone Circles Deciphered (2016), contributions to the Edinburgh University Journal of Lithic Studies (2017), and The Origins of the Universe, Earth, Life and Humanity (2018).

Herman Bender is an independent researcher with a background in geology (professional emphasis) and a technical field in industry. An amateur astronomer with decades of experience and approved historical consultant, he has nationally and internationally published in the fields of archeoastronomy, prehistoric trail research, petroform research, applied geophysics, cultural landscape studies and Northern archaic shamanistic traditions.
NEW: Mortuary Variability and Social Diversity in Ancient Greece Studies on Ancient Greek Death and Burial edited by Nikolas Dimakis and Tamara M. Dijkstra. Paperback; 205x290mm; ii+196 pages; illustrated throughout (includes 60 colour pages). 603 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694420. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694437. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Even though, at death, identity and social status may undergo major changes, by studying funerary customs we can greatly gain in the understanding of a community’s social structure, distribution of wealth and property, and the degree of flexibility or divisiveness in the apportionment of power. With its great regional diversity and variety of community forms and networks, ancient Greece offers a unique context for exploring, through the burial evidence, how communities developed. Mortuary Variability and Social Diversity in Ancient Greece brings together early career scholars working on funerary customs in Greece from the Early Iron Age to the Roman period. Papers present various thematic and interdisciplinary analysis in which funerary contexts provide insights on individuals, social groups and communities. Themes discussed include issues of territoriality, the reconstruction of social roles of particular groups of people, and the impact that major historical events may have had on the way individuals or specific groups of individuals treated their dead.

About the Editors
Nikolas Dimakis is a postdoctoral research fellow in Classical Archaeology at the University of Athens. He specialises in the funerary archaeology of Classical to Roman Greece and examines the interplay of emotions, ritual and identity in the burial context. His research interests also include childhood and gender archaeology, the archaeology of religion and ritual, and terracotta lamps. Nikolas has coordinated and participated in international meetings and in many archaeological projects in Attica, the Peloponnese, Thrace and the Dodecanese.

Tamara M. Dijkstra is a researcher at the Department of Greek Archaeology at the University of Groningen. She specialises in the funerary archaeology and epigraphy of Classical to Roman Greece and examines the relation between mortuary practices, social structure, and social identities. She also studies Hellenistic domestic archaeology within the Halos Archaeological Project.
NEW: ‘Scènes de Gynécées’ Figured Ostraca from New Kingdom Egypt by Joanne Backhouse. Paperback; 205x290mm; 136 pages; 170 figures approx. (Print RRP: £28.00). 600 2020 Archaeopress Egyptology 26. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693454. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693461. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £28.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

‘Scènes de Gynécées’ Figured Ostraca from New Kingdom Egypt: Iconography and intent examines images of women and children drawn on ostraca from Deir el-Medina, referred to in previous scholarship as ‘Scènes de Gynécées’. The images depict women with children either sitting on beds in a domestic setting or in outdoor kiosks. The former are likely to show celebrations carried out in the home to mark the birth of a child. This may have included the bringing of gifts, mainly consumables and small household items. It is possible this was recorded in hieratic texts, also on ostraca, described in earlier research as gift-giving lists. The kiosk scenes may have depicted the place women gave birth in or more likely the place of confinement after birth. However, given the dense nature of settlement at Deir el-Medina it is possible these scenes were symbolic evoking the protection of Isis who nurtured Horus in the papyrus thicket of the Delta. In order to understand the purpose and intent of these images, repeat motifs are considered and their similarities to wall paintings within the village are examined. The objects are important as they represent rare examples of regional art, found only at Deir el-Medina. Also, women are the main protagonists in the scenes, which is unusual in Egyptian art as women are generally depicted alongside the male patron of the work, as his wife, daughter or sister. This publication represents the first systematic study of this material and it brings together ostraca from museums worldwide to form a corpus united contextually, thematically and stylistically.

About the Author
Joanne Backhouse completed her PhD at the University of Liverpool in 2016. Her research interests focus on depictions of non-royal women in ancient Egypt, both two and three-dimensional. She teaches in the Continuing Education department at the University of Liverpool and a variety of educational venues in the North West of England, focusing on the material culture of ancient Egypt.
NEW: Roman and Late Antique Wine Production in the Eastern Mediterranean A Comparative Archaeological Study at Antiochia ad Cragum (Turkey) and Delos (Greece) by Emlyn K. Dodd. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+208 pages; 30 figures, 42 plates. 597 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694024. £36.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694031. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £36.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Wine was an ever-present commodity that permeated the Mediterranean throughout antiquity; in particular, settlements in the eastern Mediterranean produced substantial quantities of wine for a variety of uses in the Roman and Late Antique eras.

Roman and Late Antique Wine Production in the Eastern Mediterranean devotes itself to the viticulture of two such settlements, Antiochia ad Cragum and Delos, using results stemming from surface survey and excavation to assess their potential integration within the now well-known agricultural boom of the 5th-7th centuries AD. Interdisciplinary and ethnographic data supplements the main archaeological catalogue and provides a rounded understanding of production and use. The publication of an excavated vinicultural vat in Rough Cilicia for the first time, along with the first complete discussion of the viticultural industry on Delos in Late Antiquity, underscores the significance of this study.

The combined catalogue, analysis and discussion reinforce the noteworthy position viticulture held in Late Antiquity as an agricultural endeavour, socio-cultural and economic factor engrained within eastern Mediterranean settlements.

About the Author
Emlyn K. Dodd is an Honorary Postdoctoral Associate at Macquarie University and Greece Fellow at the Australian Archaeological Institute at Athens. He was recently the Macquarie-Gale British School at Rome Scholar.
NEW: The Role of Anglo-Saxon Great Hall Complexes in Kingdom Formation, in Comparison and in Context AD 500-750 by Adam McBride. Paperback; 205x290mm; xvi+350 pages; 228 figures (165 pages in colour). Print RRP (£55.00). 596 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693874. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693881. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Following the collapse of Roman Britain, early medieval England shows little evidence for complex hierarchy or supra-regional socio-political units for nearly two hundred years, until the turn of the 7th century, when the documented emergence of Anglo-Saxon kingdoms is seemingly confirmed by the sudden appearance of the first high-status settlements – the so-called great hall complexes. This book explores the role of great hall complexes in kingdom formation through an expansive and ambitious study, incorporating new fieldwork, new quantitative methodologies and new theoretical models for the emergence of high-status settlements and the formation and consolidation of supra-regional socio-political units. This study begins with a comparative analysis of all known great hall complexes, through which evidence is presented for a broad chronological development, paralleling and contributing to the development of Anglo-Saxon kingdoms. The wider context of great hall complexes is then explored through a regional case study, charting the development of socio-economic power in the burials and settlements of the Upper Thames Valley, before situating the great hall complexes within this development. Ultimately, an overarching theoretical explanation is proposed for the emergence, development and abandonment of the great hall complexes, linking these sites with the development of a new elite ideology, the integration of new supra-regional communities and the consolidation of the newly formed Anglo-Saxon kingdoms.

About the Author
Adam McBride completed his DPhil in archaeology at the University of Oxford in 2019. During his doctoral studies, Adam collaborated with Helena Hamerow and Jane Harrison on the excavation of a high-status early medieval complex at Long Wittenham, Oxfordshire, UK. Adam previously worked in CRM/commercial archaeology in the Southeast United States, after completing an MPhil at the University of Cambridge.
NEW: Kom al-Ahmer – Kom Wasit II: Coin Finds 2012–2016 / Late Roman and Early Islamic Pottery from Kom al-Ahmer by Michele Asolati, Cristina Crisafulli and Cristina Mondin with contributions by Maria Lucia Patanè and Mohamed Kenawi. Hardback; 205x290mm; xii+340 pages; 41 figures; 22 tables; 127 plates (88 colour pages). (Print RRP £65.00). 592 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693966. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693973. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Kom al-Ahmer and Kom Wasit were ideally placed to take advantage of the Mediterranean trade given their close proximity to the Egyptian ports of Thonis-Heracleion, Alexandria, and Rosetta during the Hellenistic, Roman, Late Roman, and early Islamic period. The social and economic vitality of the sites has been revealed during investigations undertaken by the Italian archaeological mission between 2012 and 2016 and published in Kom al-Ahmer – Kom Wasit I: Excavations in the Metelite Nome, Egypt ca. 700 BC – AD 100.

This volume presents over 1070 coins (ca. 310 BC–AD 641) and 1320 examples of Late Roman and Early Islamic pottery, testimony to the considerable commercial activity in the region during the Late Antique period. Kom al-Ahmer and Kom Wasit emerge as centers of an exchange network involving large-scale trade of raw materials to and from the central and eastern Mediterranean.

About the Authors
Michele Asolati is Associate Professor of Numismatics at the University of Padua. His research focuses on Late Roman and Early Medieval coinage and on the coin finds of the Mediterranean area, having published extensively on the subject.

Cristina Crisafulli is Curator of the Numismatic Collections of the Correr Museum in Venice. Her research focuses on the Roman coins of the third century AD and on coin finds of the Mediterranean area, especially North Africa.

Cristina Mondin is the coordinator of the Kom al-Ahmer and Kom Wasit Archaeological Project and Manager of the Asolo Museum. She authored many articles on Roman and Late Roman pottery from contexts in Italy, Egypt, Turkey, and Croatia. Her research focuses on the economy and the trade in the Mediterranean.
NEW: Weaving in Stones: Garments and Their Accessories in the Mosaic Art of Eretz Israel in Late Antiquity by Aliza Steinberg. Paperback; 205x290mm; 380pp; 321 figures in colour and black & white. (Print RRP: £55.00). 581 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693218. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693225. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Weaving in Stones: Garments and Their Accessories in the Mosaic Art of Eretz Israel in Late Antiquity is the first book to trace and document the garments and their accessories worn by some 245 figures represented on approximately 41 mosaic floors (some only partially preserved) that once decorated both public and private structures within the historical-geographical area of Eretz Israel in Late Antiquity. After identifying, describing and cataloguing the various articles of clothing, a typological division differentiating between men’s, women’s and children’s clothing is followed by a discussion of their iconographic formulae and significance, including how the items of clothing and accessories were employed and displayed and their ideological and social significance. The book is copiously illustrated with photographs of mosaics and other artistic media from throughout the Greek, Roman and Byzantine world, with particular emphasis on the examples from Eretz Israel.

About the Author
Dr Aliza Steinberg received her PhD from the Department of Art History, Tel Aviv University. Her academic research is focused on garments and their accessories in the Mosaic Art of Eretz Israel in Late Antiquity.
NEW: Ancient West Mexico in the Mesoamerican Ecumene by Eduardo Williams. Paperback; 205x290mm; 400pp; illustrated throughout (approx. 321 figures). (Print RRP: £60.00). 580 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693539. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693546. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book presents a discussion of the culture history of ancient West Mexico from the time of the first human inhabitants until the last cultural developments that took place before the Spanish invasion in the 16th century. The overall narrative is played out within the context of the Mesoamerican ecumene; that is, the universe of cultural and social interactions that coalesced into one of the few pristine civilizations of the ancient world.

The book presents a long-overdue synthesis and update of West Mexican archaeology aimed at scholars, students and the general public. Ancient West Mexico in the Mesoamerican Ecumene is the first book about West Mexican archaeology written by a single author. Another unique feature of this book is that it follows a holistic approach that includes data and perspectives from sociocultural anthropology, ethnohistory, ethnoarchaeology, and general analogy with many ancient cultures within the Mesoamerican ecumene and beyond (including several of the Old World). The focus of interest is the relationship between West Mexico and the rest of the ecumene, and the role played by the ancient West Mexicans in shaping the culture and history of the Mesoamerican universe.

Ancient West Mexico has often been portrayed as a ‘marginal’ or ‘underdeveloped’ area of Mesoamerica. This book shows that the opposite is true. Indeed, Williams convincingly demonstrates that West Mexico actually played a critical role in the cultural and historical development of the Mesoamerican ecumene.

About the Author
Eduardo Williams has been involved in West Mexican archaeology and ethnohistory since receiving his BA degree in 1982. He obtained his PhD degree from the Institute of Archaeology, University College London, in 1989. Williams joined the faculty of the Colegio de Michoacán (Zamora, Mexico) in 1990, where he holds the post of Professor in the Center for Archaeological Research. He has been a visiting scholar in the Department of Anthropology, University of California at Los Angeles (1988); the Middle-American Research Institute, Tulane University (New Orleans) (1998); and the Department of Anthropology, Tulane University (2012). The following books stand out among Williams’ contributions to West-Mexican archaeology: La sal de la tierra (Colegio de Michoacán, 2003; awarded the Alfonso Caso Prize the Mexican Institute of Anthropology and History [INAH]); Water Folk: Reconstructing an Ancient Aquatic Lifeway in Michoacán, Western Mexico (Archaeopress, 2014); and Tarascan Pottery Production in Michoacán, Mexico (Archaeopress, 2017).

Reviews
‘For far too long, west Mexican prehistory has been the poor stepchild of Mesoamerican studies. Eduardo Williams’ book demonstrates the connections between this neglected region and the better known areas of the Mesoamerican world. One of the strengths of Eduardo’s book is that he puts the history of archaeological and ethnographic research into perspective… Williams links west Mexican cultures and sites to the wider world of Mesoamerica. Other writers have either ignored the subject or only touched on it lightly. Eduardo documents the important connections. For those learning about the Mesoamerican world, these specific, documented connections are invaluable… I think this will be the “go-to” volume for anyone who wants either a broad overview or to compare different regions and developments (e.g. settlement, trade, social organization) through time…’' — Robert B. Pickering, Professor of Anthropology, The University of Tulsa, Oklahoma, February 2020
NEW: Bridge of Civilizations: The Near East and Europe c. 1100–1300 edited by Peter Edbury, Denys Pringle and Balázs Major. Hardback; 176x250mm; xx+318 pages; 170 figures, 10 maps. (Print RRP £65.00). 576 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693270. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693287. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume brings together 22 of the papers presented at a conference held in Esztergom, Hungary, in May 2018 to coincide with the 800th anniversary of the crusade of King Andrew II of Hungary to the Holy Land in 1217–18. The theme, Bridge of Civilizations, was chosen to highlight aspects of the links and contrasts between Europe and the areas around the eastern Mediterranean that were visited and occupied by western crusaders and settlers in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, giving special attention to the evidence provided by archaeology and material culture, as well as historical sources.

The results of the joint Syrian-Hungarian Archaeological Mission (SHAM) to the Hospitaller castle of Margat (al-Marqab) highlighted in this volume include an up-to-date overview of the structural development of the site from 1187 to 1285, as well as particular studies of the wall paintings, cooking installations and pottery. SHAM’s recent rescue work at Crac des Chevaliers also provides the basis for studies of the water-management system and medieval burials revealed in its courtyard, while other papers examine the masonry marks and surviving evidence of medieval trebuchet damage at both castles. Other papers focus on the medieval castles of Karak (Jordan) and Jubayl (Lebanon), the medieval buildings of Latakia (Syria), the impact of the Crusades on buildings in Cairo, historic bridges in Lebanon, the medieval chapels of Yanouh-Mghayreh and Edde-Jbeil (Lebanon), piscinas in Crusader churches in the East, the images of donors found in medieval Lebanese churches, and the activity of late thirteenth-century Western metal-workers in Cyprus.

Papers focusing more particularly on historical sources include a new edition of a late eleventh- to twelfth-century pilgrimage itinerary from Hungary to the Holy Land, a discussion of two minor military orders in Hungary, and the portrayal of Sultan al-Kāmil in a contemporary western account of the Fifth Crusade.

About the Editors
Peter Edbury is Emeritus Professor of Medieval History in the School of History, Archaeology and Religion at Cardiff University. He has published widely on the history and institutions of the kingdoms founded by the crusaders in the Near East and has re-edited the legal treatises by John of Ibelin (2003) and Philip of Novara (2009).

Denys Pringle is Emeritus Professor in the School of History, Archaeology and Religion at Cardiff University. In addition to his four-volume corpus, The Churches of the Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem (1993–2009), his recent publications include a volume of translated texts, Pilgrimage to Jerusalem and the Holy Land, 1187–1291 (2012), and a volume of collected studies, Churches, Castles and Landscape in the Frankish East (2013).

Balázs Major is an archaeologist, Arabist and historian by training and holds a PhD from Cardiff University. He is the director of the Institute of Archaeology at Pázmány Péter Catholic University and a lecturer in the Department of Arabic Studies.
NEW: Farmsteads and Funerary Sites: The M1 Junction 12 Improvements and the A5–M1 Link Road, Central Bedfordshire Archaeological investigations prior to construction, 2011 & 2015–16 by Jim Brown. Hardback; 205x290mm; xxiv+596 pages; highly illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £120.00). 556 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692600. £120.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692617. Book contents pageDownload

With major contributions by Paul Blinkhorn, Dana Challinor, Andy Chapman, Chris Chinnock, Joanne Clawley, Olly Dindol, Claire Finn, Val Fryer, Rebecca Gordon, Tora Hylton, Sarah Inskip, James Ladocha, Phil Mills, Stephen Morris and Jane Timby.

MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology) undertook extensive excavations during the construction of two separate, but adjacent road schemes, some 4.5km apart near Houghton Regis and Toddington, in south Central Bedfordshire. Taken as a whole, the excavations provide a detailed multi-period dataset for regional and national comparison.

The first evidence for occupation occurred in the middle/late Bronze Age comprising pits and clusters of postholes, including four-post and six-post structures. Two pit alignments, more than 2km apart, also indicate that land divisions were being established, and in the late Bronze Age/early Iron Age a significant new settlement emerged in the valley bottom. Parts of a further contemporary earlier-middle Iron Age settlement lay at the top of the valley but neither settlement extended into the Roman period. In the late Iron Age or early Roman period three or four new settlements emerged with occupation continuing into the late Roman period in at least one of these. Of particular interest was the recovery of two significant Aylesford-Swarling type cemeteries as well as a third cemetery which largely comprised unurned burials, including some busta, but with few accompanying grave goods.

In the late 7th-century a small probable Christian conversion open-ground inhumation cemetery was established with burials accompanied by a range of objects, including a rare work box, knives, brooches, chatelaine keys and a spearhead. Parts of three medieval settlements were uncovered including one with a potters' working area.
NEW: Piazza Armerina L'area nord dell'insediamento medievale presso la Villa del Casale edited by Carmela Bonanno. Paperback; 203x276mm; 172 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 107 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694604. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694611. Book contents pageDownload

Archaeological explorations in the area north of the Roman Villa of Casale in Piazza Armerina (Sicily) were carried out in 2013-2014. Investigations on the slopes of Monte Mangone overlooking the villa, and a survey carried out in the immediate surroundings of the hill in the Colla district, provided valuable new evidence regarding the extension of the medieval town. This exansion also impacted the areas east of the villa, and on the still existing road network that connected it to the river Gela-Nociara, in whose immediate vicinity it is now supposed there was a craft district.

The exhaustive archaeological investigations in the area demonstrate that to the north there are no structures relevant to the late antique villa, dating instead to the mid-tenth century; it is therefore an inhabited area of ​​the late Islamic era which is then abandoned and leveled. After a phase of abandonment, during which the area is sporadically used as a burial place, a Norman settlement is built, datable to the mid 11th and mid 12th century.

Sui resti della Villa tardoantica del Casale di Piazza Armerina, tra il X secolo d.C. e gli inizi dell’XI si era impiantato un vasto insediamento islamico che occupava una vasta area anche a sud e a nord della Villa, di cui è stato esplorato un ampio settore con una strada glareata su cui si aprivano le unità residenziali, alcune delle quali presentavano un cortile interno basolato in cui si trovavano anche un focolare e un forno, intorno a cui si dislocavano i vari ambienti e spesso anche una scala per l’accesso al piano superiore o al tetto. Improvvisamente l’abitato venne abbandonato e i suoi resti furono livellati ; mentre a partire dalla metà dell’XI secolo viene costruito un nuovo abitato normanno, in cui si trova un ambiente rettangolare con portico laterale, una torre difensiva sul lato corto e un silos all’esterno per la conservazione delle derrate. Era un quartiere artigianale ceramico sorto sulla riva del vicino torrente Nocciara.

Nei primi decenni del XII secolo forse per un violento terremoto che colpì la Sicilia centro orientale o in seguito alla repressione della rivolta della popolazione islamica da parte di Guglielmo I, l’abitato venne abbandonato, ma la vita in esso continuò fino all’età federiciana.

L’abitato bizantino e medievale si estendeva anche alle colline retrostanti la Villa (Monte Mangone e Colla); in particolare sulla collina di C.da Colla, durante un survay effettuato su una vasta estensione di terreno, sono state raccolte terra sigillata africana e lastrine di rivestimento in marmo pregiato, che hanno fatto ipotizzare la presenza di un esteso insediamento tardo antico sulla collina retrostante a sud della Villa del Casale.
NEW: Arqueología de la Edad Moderna en el País Vasco y su entorno edited by Idoia Grau Sologestoa and Juan Antonio Quirós Castillo. Paperback; 203x276mm; iv+306 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (68 pages in colour). 106 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694383. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694390. Book contents pageDownload

Post-medieval archaeology is currently going through a critical phase of consolidation and disciplinary redefinition across Europe, where mere proposals or ambitions are becoming tangible scientific and disciplinary realities. This renovation is most evident in Southern Europe, where, until recently, these studies have been treated as somewhat marginal. The convergence of new actors and disciplines (historical archaeology, archaeology of the post-medieval centuries, professional archaeology, ethnoarchaeology or archaeological sciences), the promotion of new patrimonialization initiatives, and the creation of new action frameworks as a result of the deep economic crisis of the years 2007-2008 are some of the factors that have shaped current approaches to the archaeology of the Modern Age. Focussing on archaeological studies of the Modern Age located in the Basque Country, Arqueología de la Edad Moderna en el País Vasco y su entorno recognises the main themes investigated (cities, rural spaces, funeral spaces, consumption and production, communications systems, maritime archaeology), detects some of the strengths and weaknesses, and proposes new lines of action and disciplinary consolidation. In short, this volume aims to provide a summary of the current archaeological framework for investigations of the Modern Age in the Basque Country, and to make proposals for developing these practices in the future.

Las arqueologías postmedievales atraviesan en la actualidad una fase critica de consolidación y redefinición disciplinar en casi toda Europa, donde han pasado de ser meras propuestas o ambiciones para convertirse en realidades científicas y disciplinares tangibles. Esta renovación es más evidente en el sur de Europa, donde estos estudios han tenido hasta ahora un peso más bien marginal. La convergencia de nuevos actores y disciplinas (arqueología histórica, arqueología de los siglos postmedievales, arqueología profesional, etnoarqueología o las ciencias arqueológicas), el impulso de nuevas iniciativas de patrimonialización, y la creación de nuevos marcos de actuación como consecuencia de la profunda crisis económica de los años 2007-2008, son algunas de las causas que explican por qué se han ido definiendo con mayor claridad los contornos de la Arqueología de la Edad Moderna. A partir del ejemplo del País Vasco, este volumen realiza un diagnóstico sobre las principales temáticas indagadas (ciudades, espacios rurales, espacios funerarios, consumo y producción, sistemas de comunicaciones, arqueología marítima), detecta algunas de las fortalezas y debilidades de la arqueología de la Edad Moderna y propone nuevas líneas de actuación y de consolidación disciplinar. En definitiva, este libro pretende mostrar qué es la Arqueología de la Edad Moderna en el País Vasco en la actualidad y qué puede llegar a ser.

About the Editors
Idoia Grau Sologestoa is currently a post-doctoral researcher at the Integrative Prehistory and Archaeological Science (IPAS/IPNA) department, University of Basel. Previously, she worked at the universities of Sheffield, Nottingham and the Basque Country. Her main research interest is human and animal relationships in historical periods, from Roman to modern times. She is currently editing a book on innovations in the rural world during the Early Modern Era. ;

Juan Antonio Quirós Castillo is a Professor of Medieval Archaeology at the University of the Basque Country and Honorary Senior Research Associate at the Institute of Archaeology (University College London). He is the director of the Heritage and Cultural Landscapes Research Group of the University of the Basque Country and the Rural Medieval Research Group, CSIC-UPV/EHU. His principal interests lie in the study of the archaeology of landscapes, the archaeology of rural societies, Mediterranean archaeology, the archaeology of architecture, and the study of social c
NEW: Bar Locks and Early Church Security in the British Isles by John F. Potter. Paperback; 203x276mm; xviii+144 pages; 90 figures, 11 tables (includes 96 colour pages). 105 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789693980. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693997. Book contents pageDownload

Bar Locks and Early Church Security in the British Isles examines the evidence for the measures taken to make church buildings secure or defensible from their earliest times until the later medieval period. In particular it examines the phenomenon of ‘bar locks’ which the author identifies in many different contexts throughout England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland.

Bar locks take various forms and can be made of different materials, but they all provide a means of locking a door by placing a bar behind it from the inside which is then secured onto the door frame or housings on adjacent walls. The most dramatic examples are provided by thick wooden bars slotted into recesses incorporated in the adjacent door jambs. The volume describes and lists all the examples identified by the author and also publishes his photographs of the evidence for the first time.

The recognition of the role of bar locks in securing churches led the author to consider further measures which may have been introduced to enhance church security; these measures could Have had major implications for structural change and design in the buildings. These supplementary protective requirements and methods for achieving them are many and various and are also considered in the volume.

About the Author
John F. Potter trained as a geologist (BSc Manchester) specialising in lithostratigraphy (PhD London). He served as Principal of Farnborough College of Technology in Hampshire from 1975 to 1997, was Hon. Secretary of the Institution of Environmental Sciences, and Editor for many years of the international quarterly journal, The Environmentalist. On retirement he was appointed Emeritus Professor at the University of Surrey and joined the University of Reading in order to continue with the church building fabric studies which he started in 1975.
ARAMAZD: Armenian Journal of Near Eastern Studies Volume XIII.1-2 2019 edited by Aram Kosyan (Editor in Chief). Paperback; 165x235mm; 2 printed issues. 13 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 1829-1376-13-2018. £50.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £70.00 (No VAT). £25.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £79.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now


Volume XIII presented in two print issues (order here to receive both issues). The digital journal is presented in one volume containing both issues.

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NEW: Armenian Archaeology: Past Experiences and New Achievements edited by Aram Kosyan, Pavel Avetisyan, Arsen Bobokhyan and Yervand Grekyan. Paperback; 165x235mm; 494 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (160 colour pages). 10 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693935. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693942. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This special edition of Aramazd: Armenian Journal of Near Eastern Studies is dedicated to the 25th anniversary of the Republic of Armenia and summarises the studies conducted in Armenia in the field of archaeology (1991-2016).

Contributions included in this volume cover a significant time span, from Lower Palaeolithic to the Middle Ages. The articles summarise the archaeological surveys conducted by joint international expeditions and partly by Armenian archaeologists.

The volume also introduces the bio-bibliography of several outstanding representatives of Armenian archaeologists of the past whose activities enhanced the establishment and development of the Armenian archaeological school.